Tag Archives: belly breathing

Belly Breathing Improves Everything

Do you breathe from your chest or your belly?

With a hand on your chest and the other on your stomach — if the hand on your chest rises, then you are using your chest (Sisson).

How you breathe affects your body systems and well-being. By adjusting the breath flow to come directly from your belly versus chest, you utilize the maximum capacity of your lungs, improve cardiovascular and digestive systems, and reduce stress and anxiety. If you can retrain to breathe like the soft rise and fall of a baby’s belly, the “slow, rhythmic diaphragmatic breathing [will produce] relaxed energy” (Rossman). Whereas chest breathing can contribute to chest pains and be the reason for having trouble breathing, belly breathing allows oxygen to fully circulate the body.

Since belly breathing is a better way to breathe, sports and other activities will emphasize to breathe the diaphragmatic way. Developing a natural breathing rhythm supplied from the belly supports yoga, martial arts, kickboxing, running, singing, yelling, sleeping, and many more tasks.

For information on how to breathe from belly visit here for the slow, diaphragmatic technique.

How Can Choe’s HapKiDo help?

chkd

Including exercise throughout the week will strengthen your heart, lungs, and prevent illnesses. Especially when you have jobs that do not require a lot of moving around on foot, you are in danger of the risks from not working out. Rule of thumb, it is good to aim for at 30 minutes a day, and to do more will only benefit you more! To engage in exercise regularly will allow you to improve in belly breathing, which in turn will only benefit you.

Choe’s HapKiDo is a sly way to trick your body into liking exercising and practicing to belly breathe. A large amount of fun exists because all students work towards becoming better in kicks, self-defense, and sparring. In everyone’s minds, reaching black belt level and beyond signifies as a level of perfection. As a result of having goals, students find themselves willing to work on all physical and mental areas.

For more information on Choe’s HapKiDo, visit here.

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Citations:

Rossman, Jeffery. “Mind-Mood-Body Advisor: Why You Should Breathe Like A Baby.” Diaphragmatic Breathing and Health. Rodale News, 12 Oct. 2009. Web. 18 Feb. 2015.

Sisson, Mark. “How to Breathe Correctly.” Mark’s Daily Apple. Mark’s Daily Apple, 20 Apr. 2014. Web. 18 Feb. 2015.

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Written by: Christie McGowan