Tag Archives: Choe’s HapKiDo in Flowery Branch

Health and Wellness Class for Tai Chi Flowery Branch

Tai Chi Flowery Branch

–Martial Arts location offers an opportunity to learn Tai-Chi, QiGong, and more.

Flowery Branch– People may rise up in the mornings to run, and others may be found heading to a fitness class that has them peacefully moving from QiGong, to Tai Chi, and to Yoga. This class is called Health and Wellness (Tai Chi Flowery Branch), and it is offered by the local Choe’s HapKiDo studio in Flowery Branch. Classes are offered twice a week: Wednesdays at 10 A.M. and Saturdays at 9 A.M.

A martial arts location ran by her and her husband who are both second degree black belts, Instructor Patti Ann Rivera describes how the Health and Wellness class allows all ages to positively increase their well beings with a relaxing, low-impact, and meditative course.

Each class is forty-five minutes long, and it begins with general respect by bowing to each other. As Instructor Patti Ann describes, “We then start with QiGong, which are breathing exercises. Next, calisthenics to warm us up, which includes knee bends and circles. After that, we go into more deep stretching in the style of Zen Kinesthetics. The breathing exercises warm up our bodies and give us a little aerobic activity. And then we move into more QiGong to stimulate all bodily functions. We then move on to the Tai Chi form, and then we end with yoga and meditation.”

Class participant Wade Andrews, age 65, has happily been coming the last four months, “Tai-Chi is perfect for Parkinson’s Disease, and I have finally found a great place to take class.”

For 44-year-old Paula Rowell, who also takes Kickboxing and HapKiDo classes at Choe’s HapKiDo, shares: “Each one of them is a building block with another. The Health and Wellness class helps me with my balance in HapKiDo. In HapKiDo, it helps me with technique and form, which prevents less injury in kickboxing. Plus, they are all a good outlet for stress.”

The main benefits one can experience from the class at Choe’s HapKiDo in Flowery Branch includes better flexibility, extra stamina, an increase in circulation and mobility, and a better grasp on concentration and focus.

As a lot of forms of martial arts like Tai Chi and QiGong are in respect to nature, Instructor Patti Ann likes to have class outdoors at a nearby park during the mild weather months. One perspective that she shares is that each season is connected with the techniques performed in class. To benefit the organs, like the heart that may not be so active during winter, the moves and exercises are meant stimulate them.

For anyone who is interested in try Choe’s HapKiDo Health and Wellness class, the first class is complimentary.

For more information about Choe’s HapKiDo in Flowery Branch and their other locations, check out www.ilovemartialartsgeorgia.com.

Choe’s HapKiDo Partners with the Carrington Academy Preschools

A Q&A on Choe’s HapKiDo at the Carrington Academy

Featuring: Instructor Michael Scott

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As a Black Belt instructor at Choe’s HapKiDo, Instructor Michael Scott, 46, has become a familiar face at the Carrington Academy Preschools (the Academy) in three of the locations: Midway, McFarland, and Windermere. He enjoys advancing in the martial art under Cumming’s head instructor, Instructor RJ LoPresti. In the midst of all the training, he clearly has passion in teaching people HapKiDo, and leading the Kids Karate Program at the Academy is just another platform.

Qs & As

  • Q1: As you are part of the Choe’s HapKiDo Cumming martial arts program, what is it like to teach martial arts at the Carrington Academy Preschool in Windermere?
  • A1: Well to start, I have been teaching at the Carrington Academy Schools for 2 years. This is my second year [Nov. 2016]. We are part of their ancillary programs for their students. If the school has an interest in a karate-type program at their school, we will help them out. The main focus for the program is very similar to our Little Ninjas program. We teach some basic techniques (no belt level) and focus mainly on discipline, respect, and focus. We will take students age 3 to school age, but I have mainly 4 and 5 year olds. I go to three different Carrington campuses, one day a week. The students take a 30 minute class. Currently, I have a total of 13 students across the 3 campuses. I feel honored to have these classes to teach. It shows me that Instructor LoPresti and Master Murphy both trust me to represent the art outside of the main school.
  • Q2: Oh wow! Which locations of the Carrington campuses do you instruct at? Also, how big are your classes?
  • A2: I teach at the Midway, McFarland, and Windermere campuses. I believe that Carrington contacted Instructor LoPresti about having classes last year. Right now, I have class sizes of 3, 4, and 6. The most I might try to tackle at these ages would be 8.
  • Q3: What is an ancillary program?
  • A3: The ancillary programs are additional programs that some of the daycares bring in to bolster their program. Classes such as Spanish, Art, Music, Playball, Amazing Athletes, Gymnastics, and Ballet.
  • Q4: Is teaching the 4-5 year olds at the Academy different from teaching at Choe’s?
  • A4: As for the difference in teaching at the school, the classes are less structured in the fact that the kids don’t wear uniforms. We don’t have belts or the progression through the belts. But the way a class is conducted is the same. We bow in, do warm-ups, target kicking, hand techniques, and self defense. We don’t do rolling and sparring for the safety of the kids. But if any of the parents would like to add that, I always direct them to the school [Choe’s HapKiDo Cumming].
  • Q5: How did you start teaching at the Academy? What made you interested in helping out with the Kids Karate program?
  • A5: As to how I got started, Instructor LoPresti was getting really busy with his duties as the school was growing. I was without a job at the time, and he felt confident enough in my skills to ask if I wanted to teach the classes. Things just worked out from there. This year, I see some of the students I had last year, and they will come up and give me hug. That is always nice. It lets you know you did your job, changing lives one class at a time.
  • Q6: With each academic year at the Carrington Academy, how long would a martial arts program last? Is there a name for the program that the preschool uses?
  • A6: At Carrington, we just call them [the programs] Kids Karate Classes. The parents can sign up for six months or a year. That is actually set by Carrington.

For more information on Choe’s HapKiDo in Georgia, visit: www.ilovemartialartsgeorgia.com. Choe’s HapKiDo serves the following locations: Cumming, Duluth, Flowery Branch, Lawrenceville, and Loganville.

For more information on the Carrington Academy Preschools, visit www.carringtonacademy.com.

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Interviewed by: Christie McGowan

Choe’s HapKiDo Hosts a 5K Run/Walk Fundraiser for a Local Private School

Cumming, GA, October 15, 2016 – Choe’s HapKiDo hosted a 5K fundraiser to donate all proceeds for Alexsander Academy, a school where children are academically challenged regardless of learning differences and special needs. The 140 racers of The Academics 4 All 5K Run/Walk were composed of students, parents, kickboxers, and martial artists. In fact, this is the second year straight that Choe’s HapKiDo organized an Academics 4 All 5K race.

The race kicked off at 8:30am at West Bank Park in Cumming, GA. The racers were divided into categories according to age, and the top three racers in each group received medals. Waters and bananas were included for after the race.

For some of these participants, the Academics 4 All was their first 5K. This was the case for twenty-five-year-old HapKiDo instructor Zach Vaughn and fifty-two-year-old fitness kickboxer Duuna Richardson. Vaughn recalled that his biggest challenge during the race was to not slow down, “It was easy to keep going because of all my fellow peers who kept pushing themselves the entire time, so that gave me motivation to keep going.”

For 5K participant Duuna Richardson, she had previously participated in races as a volunteer, so the Acadmics 4 All was her first race, “The biggest challenge was completing the race…But the best part of the race was running across the finish line and ultimately winning a medal.”

Everybody involved in the race enjoyed the landscape of the grand park while also feeling proud for coming together for a good cause. Choe’s HapKiDo tries to find ways to help better the community. From participating in canned food drives and collecting school supplies for students in the communtiy, the 5K race is a way to encourage a school like Alexsander that is also making a difference in children’s lives.

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Alexsander Academy

For more information on the programs offered at Alexsander Academy, visit www.alexsanderacademy.org.

Choe’s HapKiDo

Choe’s HapKiDo serves the following Georgia cities: Cumming, Duluth, Flowery Branch, Lawrenceville, and Loganville. Kids and adults alike experience the incredible benefits of HapKiDo such as improving skills in confidence, respect, perseverance, and discipline. Our martial art programs are geared towards changing lives, one black belt at a time.

For more information on Choe’s HapKiDo, visit www.ilovemartialartsgeorgia.com.

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Written by: Christie McGowan

Zach Vaughn crosses the finish line!
Zach Vaughn crosses the finish line!
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Duuna Richardson beaming with her medal and the triumph of winning at the 5K!

The Day of The Belt Test – Karate Buford

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If not a spectator or an instructor helping out, the days leading up to the monthly Karate Buford belt tests play with the testers’ minds. Maybe the students feel indifferent at the beginning of the month, but when it is the week of the belt test, anticipation and nervousness increases. And the night before? Sleep may or may not have been missed. While numerous thoughts flood the mind, it is possible to go in to the belt test feeling clear headed. When rising up on the day of the belt test at Karate Buford, one can either wait for the time to pass, or use the time effectively and prepare. As a result of spending time to ready the mind, one can better his/her performance at Karate Buford by cultivating a positive mindset.

Things To Do the Day of the Belt Test at Karate Buford

Allot self generous time to prepare. Set aside enough time that will not feel rushed. Determine what all needs to be done and the time it takes to finish all. Do you need to eat? Get ready? Is your sparring gear packed? Do you have a secure ride?

Review concepts and terms. Not only do the belt tests  assess the physical aspect of students, but they also quiz their knowledge on martial art concepts and Korean martial arts vocabulary.

Meditate. As a Karate Buford  instructor might say, “Your breath is a reflection of your mind.” As one is sitting on the floor, there is something powerful about shutting the eyes. Suddenly, the mind can become aware of what is going on inside, and wash away the negative vibes. If the mind is wild like a loud, crashing ocean, there is an option to instead visualize the smooth, clear top of a serene lake. When the mind relaxes and concentrates on one’s breath, the mind can reach peace. Good things happen when the mind is cool and alert.

Warm-up. As the belt test presents itself as one big exercise to show off the students’ skills, it is wise to warm-up the body. Whether or home or by arriving early to the test center, preparing the body for action goes a long way.

On any given test, even beyond a belt test at Karate Buford, one wants to give it his/her all. At Karate Buford,  belt test days are big days for students. Karate Buford belt tests are an event that requires 100% effort. They also show students how everything in training comes together. By preparing the mind before test time, students can test their best.

For more information on Karate Buford, visit Karate Buford.

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